Sands of Time Title
This site provides detailed information on the sand dunes of the Sefton coast in North West England
 
Home Page
  Quality of Coastal Towns
Project Partners
Tourism and the Mersey coast
Visitor Research Programme
Visitor Profiles
Visitor and Traffic Counts
Transport
Use by local people
Caravan Park Survey
   
Site Data
RSPB Marshside
Ainsdale and Birkdale Sandhills local nature reserve
Birkdale Sandhills, Sands Lake, Ainsdale Discovery Centre and Ainsdale and Birkdale Beaches
Ainsdale Sand Dunes National Nature Reserve
English Nature and Fisherman's Path
National Trust, Formby
Lifeboat Road
  Lifeboat Road carpark area and Wicks Lane/Kirklake Path
  Crosby Coastal Park
  Crosby Marine Park, Hall Road and Hightown Dunes
Quality of Coastal Towns Interreg IIc Project
Transport Survey
The aim of the transport survey was to find out visitors' views about public transport on the Merseyside coast and to identify possible barriers to public transport use.

The surveys were carried out by trained interviewers at four Merseyside sites. Two of the sites were on the Sefton coast, Formby National Trust reserve (Victoria Road) and Crosby Marine Park. These two sites were specifically used for the survey as they feature in Merseytravel's Walkabout, and Out and About leaflets.

The following data tables summarise the findings. Full data can be viewed at The Sefton Coast Website.

Transport to the Coast

 
Transport Survey (%)
Main Visitor Profile Survey (%)
Car
68
73.2
Foot
16.4
15.5
Train
7.5
3.8
Bicycle
3.0
4.8
Motorcycle
2.6
0.5
Public bus
2.1
0.9
Other
0.5
0.6

(Shaded area denotes public transport)

The survey shows that a higher percentage of visitors at sites within easy reach of public transport had travelled to the site by public transport. However most respondents still travelled to the sites by car.
Why visitors travelled to the site by car:
Convenience
77.5%
Always use car
29.9%
Someone else made the decision
4.3%
Cheaper
3.6%
Mobility reasons
1.4%
Other
1.4%
82% of respondents had access to a car. This is higher than the car ownership figures for the Merseyside region where just over 50% of households own a car. (Merseyside Local Transport Plan, 2000)
Regular Users of Public Transport
37% of people surveyed said that they used public transport at least once a week. 94% of the regular users would like to see changes to their public transport service.

Improvements suggested to public transport were:

(listed in order of priority)

  • More reliable services
  • Cheaper fares
  • More frequent services
  • Better standards of comfort
  • Improved safety
  • Better parking

 

Occasional Users of Public Transport
63% of people surveyed said that they did not use public transport on a regular basis. Almost 40% of these occasional users said nothing would encourage them to use public transport.

Improvements suggested to the public transport service were:

(listed in order of priority)

  • More reliable services
  • More frequent services
  • Cheaper fares
  • Better parking at stations
  • More convenient stops
  • Improved safety at stations
  • Higher standard of comfort
Cycling

1 in 4 people surveyed said that they cycle. Improvements that they would like to see are:

(listed in order of priority)

  • More cycle routes
  • Better maintained cycle paths
  • Better information on routes
  • Secure parking
 
Walking

78% of people surveyed said that they go walking as a leisure activity. Improvements that they would like to see are:

(listed in order of priority)

  • Better maintained paths
  • Paths for walkers only
  • More toilets
  • New routes

 

For more information about this project email dunes@hope.ac.uk at Liverpool Hope University.
  Go to the site of Liverpool Hope University    

Liverpool Hope University worked with English Nature and the
Sefton Coast Partnership to implement the Sands of Time project.